What is a Licensed Midwife?
What are the benefits of Licensed Midwifery care?
When do I begin prenatal care?
How do I begin care with Rosemary Birthing Home?
What forms of payment do you accept?
Do I need a Pediatrician?
How do I obtain a birth certificate and social security card for my baby?
Who will clean up after the birth?
Do I need an OB in addition to a Licensed Midwife for my prenatal care?
Do you offer VBAC (Vaginal Birth After Cesarean) options for families?
Is homebirth safe?

What is a Licensed Midwife?

(Compiled from Citizens for Midwifery and Florida Friends of Midwives)

Licensed Midwives are autonomous maternity care providers for women experiencing normal, low-risk healthy pregnancies. They work to meet their communities’ needs in a variety of settings: clinic location, classes, seminars, clients’ homes, birth centers, or in the hospital if a transfer during labor is required.

Florida Licensed Midwives are direct-entry midwives. A direct-entry midwife receives specialized training and education in the academics and skills specific to midwifery practice. Although many direct-entry midwives may hold degrees and certifications in other disciplines, this is not mandatory. To become licensed in Florida, an applicant undertakes an intensive three-year program of academic and clinical education and then passes the North American Registry of Midwives (NARM) national certification examination for state licensure. The educational programs are founded upon the core competencies of the Midwives Alliance of North America (MANA). All skills necessary to practice midwifery are included into Florida midwifery educational programs and consist of, but are not limited to, nursing, pharmacology, alternative medicine, obstetrics, gynecology, fetology, embryology, genetics, lab and diagnostics and many other disciplines. Clinical internships are mandatory and integrated into the direct-entry midwifery educational programs and involve home birth, birth center, and hospital clinical experiences.

The state of Florida has licensed midwives since 1931. In 1982 and again in 1992, The Midwifery Practice Act was updated, based on the World Health Organization (WHO) standards and on successful European direct entry midwifery programs. Throughout Europe and the rest of the world as well as in Florida and many other states, midwifery is a profession that is separate yet complimentary to nursing, obstetrics, and all other health care professions. The wellness oriented model of care utilized by the licensed midwife promotes good pregnancy outcomes and the acquisition of good health habits, with continuity of care from early in pregnancy through the first weeks after the baby’s birth. Utilization of midwives is safe and cost effective maternal health policy, recommended by the World Health Organization.

Midwives provide safe and effective maternity care.

What are the benefits of Licensed Midwifery care?

Licensed Midwives are experts in homebirth and birth center birth.
Licensed Midwives are autonomous practitioners; they are supervised by Florida law, not by physicians. Therefore, they may provide more flexible childbirth options.

When do I begin prenatal care?

You should begin care as soon as possible. It is best if you are seen during your first trimester (before 12 weeks pregnant). Some of the discomforts and concerns of early pregnancy can be made easier by starting prenatal care early and getting nutritional counseling with the midwife. If you are not able to be seen during the first trimester please set up your initial appointment as early as possible.

How do I begin care with Rosemary Birthing Home?

The first step to begin care at Rosemary Birthing Home is to attend a Choices in Childbirth/Orientation Class. These are made by appointment and can be arranged by calling Carmela at 941-228-7303 to register.

What forms of payment do you accept?

By Florida law (Florida Statute Number 627.6574), birth with a licensed midwife at Rosemary Birthing Home or at your own home is covered by any group, blanket, or franchise policy of health insurance that provides coverage for maternity care. In accordance with this statute, Rosemary Birthing Home care is covered at varying levels by most insurance plans. Rosemary Birthing Home accepts Medicaid. However, Medicaid does not cover some expenses incurred at the birthing home. You will be informed of expenses which you are responsible to pay. If you have insurance, all labs and ultrasounds will be billed directly to the insurance company by the provider of those services unless your insurance company directs us to do otherwise. If you do not have insurance we have a self pay plan available. We accept Visa and Mastercard. Ultimately, you are responsible for all charges.

Do I need a Pediatrician?

Yes. Your baby will need to be seen by a pediatrician within 24-48 hours after birth. There is no need, however, for you or your baby to go to the hospital following the birth unless a complication arises.

How do I obtain a birth certificate and social security card for my baby?

After the birth of your baby the birthing home will submit a birth certificate to the health department. Following its submission, a social security card is mailed to the parents in 6-8 weeks. You may obtain a copy of the birth certificate from the Health Department’s Vital Statistics department for an average fee of $15.00.

Who will clean up after the birth?

Your birth care team will take care of everything after your birth. When the midwife feels it’s time she will call a birth assistant in to aide her. The birth assistant and midwife will: feed you a meal, wash the laundry, disinfect the birth area, clean and disinfect the pool or bathtub, take out any garbage and do anything else that will allow you to focus on nurturing your baby over the next few days.

Do I need an OB in addition to a Licensed Midwife for my prenatal care?

No- Licensed Midwives offer complete prenatal care and laboratory testing. If you desire an ultrasound the midwife will refer you out to a recommended facility.

Do you offer VBAC (Vaginal Birth After Cesarean) options for families?

For most women, VBAC is a safe choice. The National Institutes of Health and the American College of Obstetrics and Gynecology both issued position statements in 2010 recommending trials of labor after cesarean for women with one low transverse uterine incision, and in many cases, two. The Florida Agency for Health Care Administration currently prevents women from pursuing VBAC births in Florida birth centers. However, women who meet the requirements of a thorough risk assessment and physician consult and approval may choose to have a home VBAC with our licensed midwives. For more information on the safety and research concerning VBAC, please visit these sites:

International Cesarean Awareness Network

National Institutes of Health Vaginal Birth After Cesarean Statement

Childbirth Connection: VBAC or Repeat C-Section?

Is homebirth safe?

According to history and countless research studies homebirth is a very safe option for women. We encourage you to refer to the following websites as resources for self-study regarding homebirth.

British Medical Journal Study of Homebirth in North America

Childbirth Connection

Citizens for Midwifery

Coalition for Improving Maternity Services

The Compleat Mother

Florida Friends of Midwives

Midwifery Today

Midwives Alliance of North America

Science and Sensibility

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